Police Get Pocket Guides As Tool In Crime Fighting

Image 1: (from left) Senior UN Human Rights Advisor at the UN Resident Coordinator Office George Abuazulof; UN Resident Coordinator in Jamaica Bruno Pouezat and Commissioner of Police Major General Antony Anderson are all smiles as the UN officially made
a handover of over 2,500 pocket guides on human rights in law enforcement on Wednesday, March 13. The pocket guides will be distributed to members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF).

 

 

Members of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) have been handed another tool to assist its fight against crime, as the organisation received over 2,500 pocket guides on the application of human rights in law enforcement.

The pocket guides, presented on Wednesday, March 13, at the Commissioner of Police Major General Antony Anderson’s offices on Old Hope Road in St. Andrew, were donated by the United Nations.

With these guides, it is expected that the human rights of all Jamaican citizens will be further protected, while renewing public perception and trust in the JCF as a force for good.

The pocket guides are a culmination of the cooperation between the National Police College of Jamaica (NPCJ) and the UN High Commission on Human Rights.

Back in 2016, the NPCJ approached the UN requesting a review on human rights training for members of the JCF. Under the assistance of the former UN Human Rights Advisor Dr. Birgit Gerstenberg, the ambition was to develop a curriculum that properly reflected international human rights and training standards.

With this curriculum and the pocket guides in mind, the NPCJ can now equip members of the JCF with the knowledge and skills in respecting and protecting human rights, as outlined in the Jamaican Constitution and international treaties the island is a party to.

Image 2: (from left) Assistant Commissioner at the Independent Commission of Investigations (INDECOM) Hamish Campbell; Senior UN Human Rights Advisor at the UN Resident Coordinator Office George Abuazulof; Commissioner of Police Major General Antony Anderson; Public Defender Arlene Harrison Henry and UN Resident Coordinator in Jamaica Bruno Pouezat display a few of the over 2,500 pocket guides on human rights applications in law enforcement.

 

 

Police Commissioner Antony Anderson said human rights have been, and will always be, a topical issue as it relates to law enforcement – especially in a high-crime society like Jamaica.

He said it was challenging at times to protect human rights in situations of violence. “I recognise the difficulties that our officers face in a very high-violence environment, where the violence can escalate almost instantaneously. Yet you have to always respond with measure, in taking care of persons’ human rights in these circumstances – even as your own life may be threatened,” Anderson contended.

 

 

Gavin Riley

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